Leaders- Leave Your Ego and Emotions at the Door

Good leaders understand that bad things happen in good units. You are now a leader, it is your job to fix organizational problems and develop options while maintaining a culture of trust. Trust is lost when you overreact.

The Green Book Deep Dive – How to Avoid Emotion as a leader

You must learn to deal with bad news for the good of the organization.

It is imperative that leaders stop having negative reactions to information, news, or events.

Do you wear your heart on your sleeve and your face?

These three techniques will help prevent showing your immediate shock, disapproval, or disagreement when dealing with a Subordinate, Peer, or Superior. When Subordinates bring Bad news– Ask if anyone is seriously hurt or deceased -we can fix any other problem. Next, ask yourself, “What was my exact guidance?” Oftentimes we get in a rush and believe our guidance was crystal clear when in fact it was not awesome. Report the facts to your higher headquarters immediately along with your recommended plan of action. Good leaders understand that bad things happen in good units. You are now a Leader, it is your job to fix organizational problems and develop options while maintaining a culture of trust. Trust is lost when you overreact.

Once the situation is back on track have an AAR with your subordinate to learn from what happened and failed to happen. When Peers Bring Bad News– When a peer lets you down, find a solution and remain composed. It’s about the end state not the immediate challenge that you and the organization face. Leaders solve problems through informal peer leadership. Your reaction to bad news or challenges will determine the next evolution of peer culture in the unit. However, remember that you and others must hold your peers accountable to allow the organization to function. Accountability does not equal a public beat down. Communicate the facts to your peer and move on. When your Boss tells you something you don’t agree with – If you are a person that cannot keep your jaw from hitting the floor, execute what we call the Green Book Deep Dive. Immediately look down at your green book and take notes until you gain composure. Then communicate to your boss that you will explore options to meet their intent. Return with those options and the risk associated with each to receive a decision.

This is no small point, He or She is the Superior or Commander and you are there to support the command and its soldiers.

Do not let your initial reaction mark you as disloyal. It is said that disagreement is not disrespect. You can disagree and are encouraged to do so, but the method you choose to communicate that disagreement can be disrespectful. Unless your leader wants something immoral, illegal, or unethical your job as a leader is to create and sustain options.

If you can remove negative reactions from your leadership style when dealing with subordinates, peers, and superiors you will maintain the culture of trust throughout the organization.

Posted with permission from RallyPoint. Read Reader Comments Here!

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